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3 Epic fishing vacation fails and how to avoid them

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Imagine this, you have just booked a trip to go trout fishing in BC at a beautiful lodge with a wonderful lake and river right out front.  At the sport shows you saw video and photo proof that you would be catching 100 trout a day all on dry flies.  The owner who was at the show was nice enough to let you in on the secret that if you didn't put a deposit down right than and there with your credit card you were like to miss out on the spot.  You spend the next several months preparing, tying flies and dreaming about the slow motion, head-tail takes that were about to happen.  The problem is that when you arrive at the end of July you find out those 100 fish days only happen in June on the opening week of the season.  After that the weary fish are much more careful about what and when they eat.  Suddenly you are told the only way to catch fish at the end of July is to fly out every day inoto a different area.  By the end of your trip after the fly outs are tallied up you realize you could of gone to Alaska or even Russia for the money you just spent on planes alone!

Don’t make the mistakes that many travelling anglers have made before you, follow these simple rules and you should be ripping lips in no time.

1 :  Spend the extra money it takes to go to a reputable outfitter

Every year we all get blasted with 2 for 1 deals for the month of June, or a new lodge peddling groupon rates for most of the season.  Sure these deals seem great but it typically works out much better if you just pay that little bit extra to go to a reputable outfitter.  In most cases they are about $1000 extra for a 7 day trip.   This seems like a deal breaker at first but by the time you factor in the flights to get there, the time off work and everything else that goes into it, the extra $140 a day is usually well worth the extra service and amenities you will get.

2:   If you are travelling to an international country (not including Canada) call one of your trusted fishing booking agents.  

Booking agents have taken the time and effort to find the best lodges in any given international destination and they can give you real time advice and updates on how the lodge is run.  If a lodge has been working with a Travel company for many years and they have great comments and feedback you can feel pretty good about the place you are going.  We do a lot of work with Flywater Travel and The Fly Shop out of Redding, California.  Sure you can go to your local fly shop and some of them and incredibly in the know about where and when to go, however others  are pretty suspect.  Choose wisely on who you ask for advice, many folks in the fishing world can have ulterior motives.

3:  Bring the proper gear

We all justify costly trips in certain ways.  However if you are going to spend even a modest amount you will want to make sure you have the proper fishing gear to make sure you are comfortable during your trip.  Of course there are many gear hounds out there that always buy the newest latest and greatest, but you certainly want to take advantage of modern advances in fishing technology that have made the sport easier on its aging consumers.  The developments in layered clothing in fishing (mostly developed for skiing) have been instrumental in our ability to fishing winter steelhead.  Lines are so specialized now they can fit whatever niche fishery you are after.  The redfish rio line is one of the best bone fishing lines ever developed.  The tarpon lines hit the magical 50 foot casts with ease.  New graphite technology has made rods so light you barely even notice them after a day of fishing.  Going old school is one thing but you don’t want to be the guy wearing neoprene waders and rubber rain jackets.  Spend the money and get yourself some proper gear according to your trip, it will make a huge difference in the end.

 

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